Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Swami Chinmayanandaji's thought for the day:
The most perfect characteristic in an eminently successful life seems to be integrity - an inflexible, undaunted, firm integrity. And,  also, it seems that everyone who has cultivated this trait has drawn from it many an unseen and personal advantage over others who are striving in the same field of achievement.
The nobility of integrity is not merely in its honour, sincerity, our honesty in action, but it is rooted deeper in its quality and beauty of one's intentions. If the spring of our every thought is pure and if we have the heroism to live unfailingly ever true to the great ideals in ourselves, however impractical and utopian they may be, even inspite of all immediate failures, we still have cultivated integrity.
The personality in us, thereafter, with glowing poise unfolds, and at each apparent failure, with each insurmountable obstacle met, in each moment of social criticism faced, and from all empty laughter of pithless ridicule endured, we come to steel our nobility and reinforce our determination to live the honourable life consistent with our ideals and our goals.
Such individuals alone are evolvers, all others are mere adapters - at every turn compromising with circumstances adjusting to the changing patterns of challenges. They may struggle on, as hapless slaves to their habits, but never can they come to dominate the outer field and command the world to march to the appointed Goal or end, chosen by their own vision and will. Only a person of integrity has this power over life and it's happenings. Naturally,  then, integrity is the essential core of all eminently successful life.

Source:
Book - We Must

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Swami Chinmayanandaji's thought for the day:
The most perfect characteristic in an eminently successful life seems to be integrity - an inflexible, undaunted, firm integrity. And,  also, it seems that everyone who has cultivated this trait has drawn from it many an unseen and personal advantage over others who are striving in the same field of achievement.
The nobility of integrity is not merely in its honour, sincerity, our honesty in action, but it is rooted deeper in its quality and beauty of one's intentions. If the spring of our every thought is pure and if we have the heroism to live unfailingly ever true to the great ideals in ourselves, however impractical and utopian they may be, even inspite of all immediate failures, we still have cultivated integrity.
The personality in us, thereafter, with glowing poise unfolds, and at each apparent failure, with each insurmountable obstacle met, in each moment of social criticism faced, and from all empty laughter of pithless ridicule endured, we come to steel our nobility and reinforce our determination to live the honourable life consistent with our ideals and our goals.
Such individuals alone are evolvers, all others are mere adapters - at every turn compromising with circumstances adjusting to the changing patterns of challenges. They may struggle on, as hapless slaves to their habits, but never can they come to dominate the outer field and command the world to march to the appointed Goal or end, chosen by their own vision and will. Only a person of integrity has this power over life and it's happenings. Naturally,  then, integrity is the essential core of all eminently successful life.

Source:
Book - We Must

Tuesday, May 05, 2015

We stand as one family
bound to each other
with love and respect

We serve as an army
courageous and disciplined
ever ready to fight against
all low tendencies and false values,
within and without us.

We live honestly
the noble life of sacrifice and service
producing more than what we consume
and giving more than what we take.

We seek the Lord's grace
to keep us on the path
of virtue, courage and wisdom.

May Thy grace and blessings
flow through us
to the world around us.

We believe that the
service of our country
is the service of the Lord of lords
and devotion to the people
Is the devotion to the Supreme Self.

We know our responsibilities
Give us the ability and courage to fulfil them.

Om Tat Sat

Chinmaya Mission Pledge
by Swami Chinmayananda

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, 'Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous?' Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It's not just in some of us; it's in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

2. It's about content, not taste
One thing that I've attempted, with limited success, to bang into the skulls of countless young writers over the years is that there's a fundamental difference between a review and an opinion. The former is about assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a piece of work within the context in which it's being presented, and the latter is about expressing your special precious feels because you're a beautiful snowflake unicorn.

Saturday, May 31, 2014

Elizabeth Warren, U.S. Senator, on expecting the unexpected:
"Never be so faithful to your plan that you are unwilling to consider the unexpected. Never be so faithful to your plan that you are unwilling to entertain the improbable opportunity that comes looking for you. And never be so faithful to your plan that when you hit a bump in the road -- or when the bumps hit you – you don't have the fortitude, grace and resiliency to rethink and regroup... Plans or no plans, keep a little space in your heart for the improbable. You won't regret it."

Sunday, January 12, 2014

False memories allow us to forgive ourselves and justify our mistakes, but sometimes at a high price: an inability to take responsibility for our lives. An appreciation of the distortions of memory, a realization that even deeply felt memories might be wrong, might encourage people to hold their memories more lightly, to drop the certainty that their memories are always accurate, and to let go of the appealing impulse to use the past to justify problems of the present. If we are to be careful about what we wish for because it might come true, we must also be careful which memories we select to justify our lives, because then we will have to live by them. Certainly one of the most powerful stories that many people wish to live by is the victim narrative.
Carol Tavris, Elliot Aronson
In
Mistakes Were Made (but Not by Me): Why We Justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions and Hurtful Acts